In this week’s
issue of the Times Literary Supplement,
philosopher Thomas Pink kindly
reviews
my book Aristotle’s
Revenge
.  From the review:

Edward Feser’s Aristotle’s Revenge is presented as a philosophical defence of
Aristotelianism in its robust scholastic form, as exemplified by the work of
Thomas Aquinas.  This broadly Thomist
Aristotelianism, Feser argues, far from being a block to the study of nature,
provides a metaphysics that is the necessary foundation for any science of
nature, from physics to psychology.  The
“revenge” lies in this fact, and most especially in the indispensability of
Aristotelian doctrine to the very understanding of science and scientific
investigation itself

Aristotle’s
Revenge defends ideas in metaphysics and
philosophy of science that are very much live within contemporary philosophy,
whose support goes well beyond those willing to identify themselves as
supporters of scholasticism

[The book] provides a rich and
suggestive survey of a venerable and still very significant programme in the
metaphysics of nature
.

End
quote.  Pink raises the important question
of how the Aristotelian conception of natural teleology or finality I defend in
the book relates to goodness as a
natural property.  As he notes, the
Scholastics saw these notions as inherently linked, and it was an aspect of
their position that early modern thinkers like Hobbes attacked.

Though it is
an issue I have addressed elsewhere, I avoided doing so in the book for two
reasons.  First, I think that at least a
rudimentary kind of teleology can be defended without making reference to the
notion of the good, by way of the sorts of arguments I present in the book.  Indeed, I think that defense of this rudimentary
notion is a prerequisite to defending
the thesis that goodness is a natural property of things (rather than something
that would presuppose that
thesis). 

Second, as
Pink notes, the book is already very long as it is, and addressing the issue of
goodness as a natural property would require a book of its own.  (As it happens, David Oderberg
has
recently published such a book
.)

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