Category: F1 cars

Arrows Classic F1 Car Screams Around Goodwood In Record-Breaking Run – Motor1

Goodwood Speed Week 2020 is fully underway and this year like many other events in 2020 looks a little different. Instead of the hoards of visitors enjoying the showcase of some of the most impressive pieces of machinery on the planet, it’s simply just the cars, the track, and some passionate announcers. During this unique running of Goodwood Speed Week, the lap record was broken in a classic F1 car with a soundtrack that screamed out for miles.

Although Goodwood Speed Week is an enjoyable event to watch virtually, there’s something so strange about the lack of spectators. The fields that were once home to passionate visitors ready to enjoy a once in a lifetime lineup of vehicles is now empty. The safety of others is of course paramount at this time, and we can still look to the wonder of Goodwood Speed Week from the comfort of our own homes.

Take for example the record-setting run in the Arrows A11 classic F1 car from the 1990 Formula One Season. Powered by a Ford-Cosworth 3.5-liter DFR V8 engine that faced tough competition during its time in F1, the A11 proved that there’s plenty of impressive performance left in these older F1 cars. The Arrows A11 faced a tough grid in 1990 after the ban of turbocharging in F1. Competitors like Honda and Renault were working on V10 engines while Ferrari built V12s all of which produced more power than the A11’s V8.

A mid-field car at best, the A11 fought hard against its more powerful rivals as Ford and Cosworth worked hard to optimize the DFR V8 against this stout competition. Today we see the fruits of their labor as the A11 breaks the lap record at Goodwood and gains the recognition it deserved.  

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Racing Point to base 2021 F1 car design around Mercedes-style rear-end – Crash

Racing Point is set to base its 2021 Formula 1 car design around a Mercedes-style rear suspension. 

The Silverstone-based outfit, which currently holds third place in the constructors’ championship, has recently introduced a host of new upgrades to its controversial RP20, which has been influenced by Mercedes’ 2019 W10. 

Recent updates have included a sizeable aerodynamic upgrade at Mugello, as well as further changes to the rear suspension to provide more flexibility and greater options relating to set-up.

Racing Point is yet to introduce a full rear suspension upgrade that mirrors the design of Mercedes’ current challenger, but Green confirmed that the W11-inspired rear-end is “what we’re designing next year’s car around”. 

“It’s an upgrade to 2020 suspension, it’s not an upgrade to 2021,” Green said at the Eifel Grand Prix. “What we’re running now is 2019. 

“What they want to do is penalise us and keep us running two-year old parts rather than bring us up to date. 

“It’s not like we’re getting an advantage and bringing 2021 parts to the car. It’s only bringing it up to the same as they’ve got now.” 

Teams currently using 2019 unlisted customer parts can upgrade them to 2020-spec for next year without having to deploy tokens introduced to rein in development. 

The FIA’s decision not to drop the new rule has angered some teams who are frustrated that Racing Point and AlphaTauri will effectively get ‘free’ upgrades for their respective 2021 cars due to the loophole. 

“The rules allow us to do it,” Green explained. “We’ve cleared it with the FIA, they have no problem with us doing it. 

“The rules as written allow teams to bring their cars up to the 2020 specification, which I think is only fair. Just because we elected, before COVID started, to run 2019 suspension, shouldn’t be held against us. 

“So we should be allowed to bring our car up to the same specification as everyone else has got.”

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Man vs machine – Engineers, not racers, are the true drivers of success in motor sport | Graphic detail – The Economist

“I ALWAYS THOUGHT records were there to be broken,” Michael Schumacher, a star Formula 1 (F1) driver, said in 2013. At the time, his record of 91 career F1 victories looked safe: the closest active racer had just 32. Yet on October 11th Lewis Hamilton of Britain equalled the mark. Mr Hamilton is also on pace to tie Mr Schumacher’s record of seven F1 championships later this year.

Mr Hamilton’s ascent has ignited debate over whether he is F1’s best driver ever. Comparing athletes across eras is always hard—especially in motor sports, where a racer depends on his car. Moreover, F1 has regularly changed its scoring system and its number of races, drivers and teams.

However, statistical analysis can address many of these nuances. We have built a mathematical model, based on a study by Andrew Bell of the University of Sheffield, to measure the impact of all 745 drivers in F1 history. It finds that Mr Hamilton’s best years fall just short of those of the all-time greats—but so do Mr Schumacher’s.

The model first converts orders of finish into points, using the 1991-2002 system of ten points for a win and six for second place. It adjusts these scores for structural effects, such as the number and past performances of other drivers in the race. Then, it splits credit between drivers and their vehicles. (Today, F1 has ten teams, each using two drivers and one type of car.)

Disentangling these factors is tricky. Mr Schumacher spent most of his peak at Ferrari, as Mr Hamilton has at Mercedes, leaving scant data on their work in other cars.

However, their teammates varied. And drivers who raced alongside Mr Hamilton or Mr Schumacher tended to fare far better in those stints than they did elsewhere. If Ferrari’s and Mercedes’ engineers boosted lesser racers this much, they probably aided their stars to a similar degree. Because most drivers switch teams a few times, this method can be applied throughout history.

Between the two racers with 91 wins, the model prefers Mr Schumacher. He won 1.9 more points per race than an average driver would have done in the same events and cars, edging out Mr Hamilton’s mark of 1.8. Limited to their five best consecutive years, the gap widens, to 2.7 points per race for Mr Schumacher and 2.0 for Mr Hamilton.

This difference stems mostly from the impact of their cars. Both stars raced in the finest vehicles of their day. But 20 years ago, cars from Williams and McLaren were nearly as strong as Ferrari’s. In contrast, Mercedes now towers over its rivals, enabling Mr Hamilton and Valtteri Bottas, his teammate, to coast past lesser cars. Before joining Mercedes, Mr Bottas had never won a F1 race. He now has nine victories.

Yet on a per-race basis, the greats of yesteryear beat both modern stars. Three of the model’s top four drivers stopped racing by 1973; the leader, the Argentine Juan Manuel Fangio, won five titles in the 1950s.

These pioneers had short careers. Fangio started just 51 races, to Mr Schumacher’s 306. However, the model is impressed by them, because the impact of cars relative to drivers has grown over time. On average, it assigns drivers in the 1950s 58% of their teams’ points; today, that share is 19%. Fangio, who was a mechanic by training and won titles using cars from four different firms, was known as “the master”. The masters of modern F1 are engineers who sit behind laptops, not steering wheels.

Sources: Ergast.com; F1-Facts.com; “Formula for success: multilevel modelling of Formula 1 driver and constructor performance, 1950-2014”, by Andrew Bell et al., Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports, 2016;The Economist

This article appeared in the Graphic detail section of the print edition under the headline “Man v machine”

Reuse this contentThe Trust Project

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F1 Eifel Grand Prix

Red Bull could quit F1 if new engine rules don’t happen – Ars Technica

A pair of Formula 1 cars racing in close proximity
Enlarge / Pierre Gasly driving the Alpha Tauri Honda AT01 leads Alexander Albon in his Red Bull Racing RB16 during the F1 Eifel Grand Prix at Nürburgring on October 11, 2020 in Nürburg, Germany. The energy drink company Red Bull may quit the sport with both teams if it cannot find a solution to its engine supply problem.
Dan Istitene – Formula 1/Formula 1 via Getty Images

At the beginning of October, Honda shocked the world of Formula 1 by announcing its decision to quit the sport at the end of 2021. Currently, it supplies a pair of teams—Red Bull Racing and Alpha Tauri—both owned by the Red Bull energy drinks company. Red Bull now has to find a replacement supplier for the fiendishly expensive, insanely complicated hybrid powertrains required by the rules. And it, too, might quit the sport in 2022 if it can’t do that to its satisfaction, a warning issued this week by Red Bull’s sporting director, Helmut Marko. So what the heck is going on?

F1’s hybrid era

The first F1 cars to add an electric motor to their internal combustion engine powertrains took to the track in 2009. These were 80hp (60kW) motor-generator units (MGUs) that could recover kinetic energy from the rear wheels under braking and return it to those same wheels for short bursts of additional power during a lap. However, only four teams adopted this idea—called KERS, for kinetic energy recovery system—during the year, and it was abandoned by mutual consent at the end of that season.

In 2014, the sport adopted its current technical ruleset. The old naturally aspirated 2.4L V8 engines were replaced by new 1.6L turbocharged V6s, now with two mandatory hybrid elements to the power train. In place of KERS, there was an MGU-K (for kinetic), and a new MGU-H (for heat), which captured or deployed energy to the engine’s turbocharger. The new powertrains are hugely powerful, reaching around 1,000hp (746kW) in qualifying trim last year. And they use less fuel than ever: since this article was written in 2016, the V6es have actually now exceeded 50-percent thermal efficiency.

However, the complexity of these powertrains is on a new level for a sport that was always pretty complicated, and the development costs have been eye-watering. To make matters worse, the results have been pretty lopsided. Mercedes-AMG did a better job than anyone else right out of the gate and has been the class of the field ever since. Of the 132 races held since the new regulations started in 2014, it has won 98 of them.

Meanwhile, the other engine manufacturers have tried to catch up. Ferrari made some impressive power gains in 2019 before giving them all up again in a still-secret settlement with the sport over alleged cheating. Renault was candid about underestimating its rivals and acrimoniously fell out with Red Bull Racing. Honda entered the sport in 2015, a year earlier than it had planned but a year after the other three OEMs. It has played catchup ever since, although so far, it’s the only other OEM to rack up any wins in 2020 (one each for Red Bull and Alpha Tauri).

The next five years?

F1 has been working itself into a state about future engine rules for some time now. A burgeoning global financial crisis and then the arrival of COVID-19 have been the most recent spanners in the works, leading at long last to cost caps and big restrictions on engine development for the next few seasons until a new, yet-to-be-decided powertrain arrives in 2026. This should keep costs down, but it also locks in the inequality of performance between the different makes.

Each OEM is allowed a single upgrade to its V6, turbocharger, and MGU-K in 2021, and then again in 2022 and 2023. It’s even more restrictive for the MGU-K, control electronics, and the hybrid battery—these can have a single upgrade between 2020 and the end of 2021, and then a single upgrade between 2022-2023. After that, the specification of all these components are frozen until the end of 2025.

Red Bull’s ultimatum

Red Bull needs engines for its two teams, and it needs them soon—by next month, in fact, if it’s to design 2022’s cars around them.

Mercedes has ruled out adding Red Bull as a customer, citing a lack of bandwidth; it currently supplies powertrains to the Williams and Racing Point teams as well as its own, and next year adds McLaren to the roster as well. A Red Bull return to Renault power seems unlikely given the acrimonious split between the two in 2018, but either Renault or Ferrari would be considered if its preferred option doesn’t pan out.

That preferred option would be to stick with the Honda powertrains it currently has, assuming it can maintain and assemble them. But Marko says Red Bull is only prepared to do that if there is a total freeze on powertrain development from 2021 until 2025. Simply put, the costs of developing new iterations of these powertrains is beyond the reaches of all but major OEMs.

But a complete freeze on powertrain development would require unanimous consent from the remaining three OEMs, and that is currently lacking. Mercedes is OK with the idea, which is unsurprising given its utter dominance. Renault says it will sign off, but only on the condition that the different powertrains are brought into parity before being locked. And Ferrari says absolutely not. Which seems to bring us to an impasse—and back to Marko’s ultimatum.

Excuse me while I break out my soapbox

Even if it were agreed to, there are perils associated with a five-year freeze on engine development. While I’m often skeptical that F1 technology is ever road-relevant—that kind of technology transfer happens primarily in the world of endurance racing—I’ll allow that it does happen from time to time. For example, the turbulent jet ignition technology that has pushed F1 internal combustion engine thermal efficiency so high is about to show up in a Maserati road car. But those claims become much harder to believe in 2024 with powertrains that have remained the same for several years.

If the three engine makers are brought to parity before a freeze, that really raises questions about why the sport needs more than one engine supplier at all. (The real answer is that it would cause Ferrari to leave, and everyone is too scared of those consequences.)

Yet again, F1 finds itself at the mercy of boardroom decisions made by car companies. Throughout the 71-year history of the sport, a pattern has repeated. Car companies sense the potential for a marketing boost if they can succeed in the sport, but each race can only have one winner. It only takes a few years of heavy spending on an engine program with no championships to show for it for the suits to start asking questions, particularly when the economy gets tough. And at the end of the day, car companies build and sell cars—even ones that sell sports cars can do without motorsport, as Audi’s and Porsche’s withdrawal from the World Endurance Championship proves all too well.

To make matters worse, the sport only has these heavy, expensive, complicated powertrains because of the OEMs, which all argued that it would be impossible to spend hundreds of millions of dollars on a racing program without the illusion of environmental responsibility. (For the Nth time, F1’s carbon budget comes from the power used in wind tunnels and server farms, from the logistics of traveling the sport to 21 races a year around the world, and from hundreds of thousands of fans traveling to each of those races, not the race cars themselves.) But the huge cost and difficulty of developing a current F1 powertrain means it’s extremely unlikely that any other OEM will enter the sport before 2026.

Renault, for its part, thinks the solution is to bring the 2026 regulations forward, as that would stimulate interest from the industry. Some have suggested that F1 should ditch internal combustion entirely, but that won’t be possible until 2039 thanks to an exclusive license granted to Formula E by the sports’ governing body, the FIA.

My own daft idea is that it’s time for F1 to grasp the nettle and ditch hybrid power. Make the cars properly lightweight again at 1,102lbs (500kg) and go back to high-revving naturally aspirated engines. The sport is already planning a switch to carbon-neutral biofuels, and accelerating that switch would provide the necessary greenwashing to convince people that F1 cares about the future.

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Ricciardo: Renault F1 progress down to losing ‘hit or miss’ car trait – Autosport

Daniel Ricciardo says one of the key factors that has helped Renault’s progress in Formula 1 is that it no longer has a ‘hit and miss’ car.

The Australian’s podium finish at the Eifel Grand Prix has thrust Renault in to contention for third place in the constructors’ championship.

That battle is closely fought between Racing Point, McLaren and Renault with six rounds to go, the three teams covered by just six points.

One of Renault’s key strengths recently has been its consistency, with Ricciardo finishing in the top six at every race since the Belgian Grand Prix.

It’s that run of form that has left Ricciardo bullish about Renault’s prospects in that fight for ‘best of the rest’ behind Mercedes and Red Bull, as he feels the team can lay to rest the up-and-down pace that dogged it throughout 2019.

“From the start of the year, it’s been a new car from last year in terms of it’s been a lot better,” said Ricciardo.

“The rear of the car has picked up a lot of downforce, so that’s given us drivers confidence to nail the throttle and get off the corner better.

“It was around Silverstone, I think, we had a few updates and that really just felt like we were able to basically find a bit more ease in setting the car up and it wasn’t so hit-or-miss.

“Last year I felt we, at times, could be very fast or well outside the top ten. I think now we’re just able to sit in that sweet spot and obviously the performance is there.

“It’s proven now: we’ve done it on low downforce and high downforce circuits. So, yeah, I think it’s a good package and we should have confidence now for the remainder of the season.”

Renault’s strong form at the Eifel Grand Prix was especially significant because it came on the type of high downforce circuit that the team struggled on earlier in the year.

Team-mate Esteban Ocon believes that with the team now showing itself to be quick everywhere, it can now go to every race with sights set on delivering strong results.

“It’s definitely giving us great confidence because, as you know, we were struggling in Barcelona and Budapest, on those high downforce settings,” said the Frenchman.

“We were back on those for the Nurburgring, and the car has been feeling great and feeling strong.

“So you know that’s all behind us now.

“I’m not saying that if we go back to Barcelona, we would qualify sixth and seventh, but it’s giving us great hope and obviously great confidence to continue the season like that.”

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Feedback from stand-in Hulkenberg inspired Racing Point F1 car’s updates – Autosport

Feedback from reserve driver Nico Hulkenberg helped to inspire Racing Point’s recent update package, the Silverstone Formula 1 team’s technical director Andrew Green has revealed.

Hulkenberg gave his views on the RP20 when he drove Sergio Perez’s car at the British and 70th Anniversary Grand Prix weekends in August.

That in turn fed into the team’s development programme, the fruits of which have been seen in recent races as a new package came on stream, including changes to the suspension.

Ironically, those changes then made life difficult for Hulkenberg when he returned to the team for the Eifel GP as a last-minute replacement for Lance Stroll, as he had to adjust to a car that had changed substantially since he last sampled it.

PLUS: Why Hulkenberg’s Red Bull chance is out of his hands

“Some of the developments that we put on the car were as a direct result of his feedback in Silverstone, which was really interesting – so his feedback after the race [Eifel GP] was very intriguing,” said Green, when asked by Autosport about the changes.

“He mentioned things [at Silverstone] that he would like to be changed in the car, and how we go about setting the car up and the feel he gets from the car.

“And we made those changes after Silverstone, not expecting him ever to get back in the car again and drive it.

“But lo and behold, he does, and we get the feedback about the developments we made on the car, so that was really interesting, and really important.”

Green agreed that Hulkenberg needed time to adapt to the modified car when he drove it at the Nurburgring.

“These sort of changes we’re talking about, you can’t adjust to them in four laps, which is basically what he had to do on Saturday afternoon,” Green explained.

“He had four flying laps, and for him to adjust to the changes that we’ve made since Silverstone was going to be nigh on impossible.

“So he needed time in the car, which is what he didn’t have, but by the end of the race, he’d had plenty of time in the car and his feedback was invaluable, which was very good.”

Green said that Hulkenberg was able to confirm that the team had made the correct choices with the latest upgrades.

“Yes, effectively, [there’s] still work to do but I think we made a good step in the right direction,” he said.

“That is all part of the rear suspension and front suspension changes that we made, which were as a direct result of him driving the car in Silverstone.

“We pulled together all the updates that we planned to do into a significant update for the car.

“And that included front wing, front brake ducts, floor, rear wing endplates, and you can see the sidepods, bodywork, so that was the aerodynamic aspect.

“We did a lot of work on the internals of the rear suspension, and the way that the suspension works, to give us more flexibility, and more options on the rear suspension set-up.

“Also a change to the steering system, as well – all of those updates came between Mugello and Russia, really.”

Having impressed during his stand-in appearances, including qualifying third for the 70th Anniversary GP, Red Bull has been linked to a possible Red Bull move if the team decides to drop Alex Albon.

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Eifel Grand Prix

Charles Leclerc Reveals a Big Problem With the 2020 Ferrari F1 car – EssentiallySports

Charles Leclerc is the torchbearer for Ferrari right now. The Italians know that the SF1000s have underperformed well beyond their expectations. However, Leclerc has held his own and secured points in every race. To be honest, he had to, or else, Ferrari’s plan of catering to his needs more might have backfired.

The Monegasque was improving. The races at the beginning after the restart saw the young racer doing fairly well. However, as time passes, the problems increased.

From fighting for podiums, the racer dropped back to fighting to stay on the points table. Charles Leclerc harbors immense potential, and Ferrari should navigate ways to make the most use of him. However, they will have to fix their car first.

Formula One F1 – Eifel Grand Prix – Nurburgring, Nurburg, Germany – October 10, 2020 Ferrari’s Charles Leclerc in the pits FIA/Handout via REUTERS

We have seen many times since the beginning of the year that with little fuel we manage to get the most out of the car in qualifying, but every time we put a lot of fuel in the car we struggle,” remarked Charles Leclerc.

Well, ‘struggle’ is an understatement. Fumbling frantically to stay afloat maybe an apt expression. It is sad to see a champion team classified as a midfield competition. The Ferrari has no hopes of making it to the top 3 constructors this season. The team lacks proper leadership, on and off the track, and their strategies have been sub-par.

It happened again [at the Nurburgring] but with the medium tyres we had good pace, while with the soft tyres we had problems with graining right away,” recalled Ferrari number 16.

Read MoreCharles Leclerc “Looking Forward” to Eifel GP as Ferrari Announce Positive News

Ferrari car needs several modifications to compete in 2021

Nurburgring is a circuit that tests its racers. The chicane and the tight turns can pose a challenge for any racer on the grid. However, Charles’ end position posed as a disappointment for the racer himself. The car has not proved in any kind of circuit.

Both the drivers often complain about losing out on power and the car is slow. For them to even fight for a place, they need to be prepared. Last week saw Vettel again stuck between the Alfa Romeo cars. The Italians need to get some serious work done before 2021 if they want to win.

I didn’t want to put on the soft tyres because of what happened at the start of the race. But it was the best we could do. I expected a little more but it was again the first run that was not positive.” concluded the Monagasse.

That is the underlying problem. They are out of options. They have no alternatives left. The team principal at Ferrari, Mattia Binotto, was verbose about adopting strategies from the golden age of Ferrari. Even if they have adopted them, they are still far from learning how to implement them.

Read More – WATCH: Charles Leclerc Thrilled on the Team Radio With P4 Start for the Eifel GP

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Mercedes stopped developing 2020 F1 car “a long time ago” – Motorsport

Mercedes has won 9 of the 11 races so far this season and is on course to win both championships for the seventh year in a row, its drivers sitting first and second in the drivers’ championship.

But Red Bull appeared to make a step towards Mercedes’ level of performance across last weekend’s Eifel Grand Prix after bringing a series of updates for its RB16 car to the race.

Max Verstappen took provisional pole ahead of the final runs in Q3, and was able to stay close to the Mercedes duo of Lewis Hamilton and Valtteri Bottas in the opening stages of the race.

Teammate Alexander Albon also said he thought Red Bull was now “a lot closer” to Mercedes thanks to its latest updates.

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Mercedes has not released any updates for its W11 car for a number of races, with team boss Wolff saying it had halted its development a while back.

“We finished [the updates] a long time ago, and that has always been in the past,” Wolff said.

“What we looked at is a very thoroughly thought through decision, because not in every championship can you afford to close the book early.

“But the rules changed quite a lot for next year and in that respect, like in previous years, we decided to switch to next year’s car.

“This is why you can see the shifting performance between the teams. We always have a very strong start and middle of the season, and then whoever continues to develop is strong at the end.”

Although the 2020 cars will largely be carried over into 2021 as part of a cost-saving measure resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, teams will be allowed to develop certain areas of the chassis via a token system.

Wolff’s thoughts were echoed by Mercedes trackside engineering director Andrew Shovlin, who acknowledged Red Bull was making progress more quickly at the moment.

“I think they are developing quicker than we are at the moment,” said Shovlin.

“And we’ve seen that progressively. But to be honest, we’ve seen that in most of the recent years, they tend not to start as strongly as we do. I can’t really think of a year recently where they’ve not been with us by the end.

“So if we see that trend continue, then the remaining races are going to get tougher, and it will be harder to try and keep getting the pole on Saturday and winning on a Sunday.”

Red Bull has claimed a single race win this year, courtesy of Verstappen at the 70th Anniversary Grand Prix, and sits 180 points behind Mercedes in the constructors’ standings.

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Mercedes ended 2020 F1 car development “a long time ago” – Autosport

Mercedes stopped developing its 2020 Formula 1 car “a long time ago”, according to team boss Toto Wolff, as its advantage over Red Bull appeared to narrow at the Nurburgring.

Mercedes has won nine of the 11 races so far this season and is on course to win both championships for the seventh year in a row, its drivers sitting first and second in the drivers’ championship.

But Red Bull appeared to make a step towards Mercedes’ level of performance across last weekend’s Eifel Grand Prix after bringing a series of updates for its RB16 car to the race.

Max Verstappen took provisional pole ahead of the final runs in Q3, and was able to stay close to the Mercedes duo of Lewis Hamilton and Valtteri Bottas in the opening stages of the race.

Team-mate Alexander Albon also said he thought Red Bull was now “a lot closer” to Mercedes thanks to its latest updates.

Mercedes has not released any updates for its W11 car for a number of races, with team boss Wolff saying it had halted its development a while back.

“We finished [the updates] a long time ago, and that has always been in the past,” Wolff said.

“What we looked at is a very thoroughly thought through decision, because not in every championship can you afford to close the book early.

“But the rules changed quite a lot for next year and in that respect, like in previous years, we decided to switch to next year’s car.

“This is why you can see the shifting performance between the teams. We always have a very strong start and middle of the season, and then whoever continues to develop is strong at the end.”

Although the 2020 cars will largely be carried over into 2021 as part of a cost-saving measure resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, teams will be allowed to develop certain areas of the chassis via a token system.

Wolff’s thoughts were echoed by Mercedes trackside engineering director Andrew Shovlin, who acknowledged Red Bull was making progress more quickly at the moment.

“I think they are developing quicker than we are at the moment,” said Shovlin.

“And we’ve seen that progressively. But to be honest, we’ve seen that in most of the recent years, they tend not to start as strongly as we do.

“I can’t really think of a year recently where they’ve not been with us by the end.

“So if we see that trend continue, then the remaining races are going to get tougher, and it will be harder to try and keep getting the pole on Saturday and winning on a Sunday.”

Red Bull has claimed a single race win this year, courtesy of Verstappen at the 70th Anniversary Grand Prix, and sits 180 points behind Mercedes in the constructors’ standings.

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WATCH: Airbus ACH160 Helicopter Vs Renault F1 Car – What Is Your Choice Going Around The Track? – AutoSpies.com

Every time I watch a Formula 1 race in person, another vehicle almost steals the show away from the cars on track: the broadcast helicopter.

Whoever pilots the TV helicopter for the United States Grand Prix isn’t scared to swoop in closer to the track than you’d ever expect. Those trick chase shots come from somewhere, after all. 

Airbus wanted to steal a little bit of that F1 magic to promote their new ACH160 helicopter, so they sent it to chase a Renault F1 car around Circuit Paul Ricard. Because there aren’t any other cars or fans to worry about, this helicopter runs even closer to the track, and it’s awesome.
 

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