Category: Photography

Simple Beauty Photography – WLUC

MARQUETTE, Mich. (WLUC) – With school closures and downsized public and private events, like weddings, being the norm this year rather than the exception, many folks might find it hard to fill their 2020 photo albums with the standard slew of school pictures or wedding photos — and that’s where Bethany Vaughn comes in.

Vaughn, the owner of Simple Beauty Photography, has been a freelance photographer in the Marquette area for almost a decade. She’s taken photos for numerous community organizations, fundraisers, school events, families, and individuals.

When asked about how the pandemic may have changed her perspective on her craft and her business, Vaughn replied with, “I’ve started to view it as less of a want and more of a service…. something necessary to bring people together.”

And she’s doing just that next weekend, November 6th, 7th, and 8th at Campfire CoWorks in downtown Marquette. Vaughn is offering school portraits, business headshots, and even some holiday-themed photos as well to those who might want to get a jumpstart on Christmas Cards or other holiday photo ops. The event will be safe all throughout the three days, with masks required, and social distancing enforced.

You can find a link to Simple Beauty Photography’s website here, and a link to Vaughn’s Campfire CoWorks event here.

Copyright 2020 WLUC. All rights reserved.

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Music Photography: For Memory, For Community, For Activism | Flagpole – Flagpole Magazine

I have to keep buying more iCloud storage simply for the pictures. Stacks of Polaroids litter the top of my dresser. Boxes of them are stashed in storage bins. Sometimes I become self-conscious when I notice how often I pull up my camera app around others or how ridiculous it is that I bring my Fujifilm Instax Mini to indoor places that aren’t conducive to the necessary flash. I’m self-conscious for only a moment because I soon acknowledge that photographs are frozen moments in time, forever existing in some digital or tangible form. 

Magic resides in photographs, especially for a person with a terrible memory like my own. They remind me that I actually saw that sunset, that waterfall, that mountain range, those favorite musicians of mine—especially the music. My Instagram posts are sprinkled with blue and violet hues from the stage lights at live music performances. “Ah, yes. I remember—I was there in front of them swaying, jumping with everyone around me to those nostalgic songs.” During these pandemic times, where live shows lie sleeping, I’ve often resurfaced the music footage that I’ve taken. I once thought that the footage is simply a hoarder’s fancy, never to be looked at, simply stored for comfort, as if my memory exists if, and only if, the material exists. 

However, in the aching absence of live music, every captured performance that I went through operated as a portal. Those photographs and clips brought me back—back to the very day I saw Turnover with my mom, where she hooted and hollered louder than I did; I was taken back to the greatest days with my best friends, where we danced to music from Band of Horses, The Growlers, The Flaming Lips, a multitude of other bands; I was taken back to the days where I went to shows alone, feeling fundamentally connected, empowered, full. Reflection has been vital during this time of uncertainty, and those frozen moments are an important tool. This leads me to believe that taking a picture is a powerful act because of its successive reflection. This leads me to believe in photography’s gravitational capabilities, not just for the individual but also for a unified whole.

Music photography is the documentation of a universal language that carries people and movements through time. There are no words to be read, like lyrics on the internet, but the 1000-word cliché is there in these moments, inside and outside the venue. Photographs are a personal record and, once shared, a public one. Photography strengthens community through this shared memory—“If we take a picture of another person, we pose them in exteriority—exposing them to the gaze of others and to themselves as other. In this way, we open up a space of communication and of emotional connection,” wrote University of Toronto Mississauga photography professor Louis Kaplin in his journal article. The people pointing and shooting—sometimes allowed, sometimes not—elevate particular messages through artful, conscious decisions. Photography is history in the making, illustrating social, cultural and political transformations for the self and for the collective.

Capturing the Human

Sue Myers Smith values the personal record she creates with her photography. Smith is the public relations manager for the University of Georgia (UGA) Center for Continuing Education & Hotel and uses photography to promote the Center and its events, among other responsibilities in her multipurpose role. Outside of public relations and marketing for UGA, she freelances and photographs her husband’s band, Theocracy, a Christian progressive-power-metal band.

Smith started experimenting with photography when she was 11 years old. She got her hands on her dad’s heavyweight 35-millimeter single-lens-reflex camera from the ‘60s and strove to make the camera do what she saw. Smith said she was always observant, picking up the details that others failed to see. Theocracy’s most popular pictures on social media were of the band off-stage.

At shows, concerts and festivals, there’s often a physical barrier between the artist and the audience, a raised stage or gate, but there’s also an invisible barrier of status, strengthened by their fame or a deep love for the talented, placing them on a pedestal. Capturing those moments off-stage, where musicians are portrayed at eye-level with the fans, breaks down that barrier and invokes a greater relationship. “It’s like, ‘Oh, they’re real people,’” Smith said.

As it is for Smith, capturing the vulnerable moments is important for Nolan Terrebonne, another freelance photographer based in Athens. Terrebonne was featured in a music photography exhibition at the tiny ATH gallery earlier this year. The exhibition showcased Athens-based photographers, musicians and venues. Terrebonne had only pursued paid photography work in the past 10 years but has been a hobbyist as long as he’s been active in music.  He’s been a musician for 21 years, spending some of that time playing with national-touring band Planet Jive and regional-touring act SHOWTIME. He also owned TNEB-RCP MUSIC GROUP, a small, independent label, and co-owned Odd Squad Studios, a recording studio.

With bigger concerts, there’s dozens of photographers on the scene, and that’s why Terrebonne stresses an all-access pass at any gig. “I’ll take a cut in pay on that shit. Why? Because I get to hang out with these guys and be a fly on the wall, just being in the shadows, not interrupting their energy and whatever emotions they got going on.” Music photography has a strong emotional component, communicated through the energy on stage and an onlooking sea of heads, but humanizing them is part of the work.

“As soon as they spot you and put on that rock-star attitude, it’s over,” Terrebonne said. It’s those moments “when somebody is playing something, they might have a lyric in their head or that moment—maybe something happened that day on the way to the show. You look over and that one person has that look on their face and that aura around him, that ‘I’m not paying attention to anything else around me right now.’ I’m doing those.” His favorite shots are of musicians’ solemn faces in the midst of rock-show chaos.

Sneaking the Picture

Amber Perry Wilco’s frontman Jeff Tweedy is on the big screen at Atlanta’s Chastain Park Amphitheatre on October 18, 2019.

UGA photography professor Kyser Lough thumbed through the shelf full of books on photography in his office. Lough—a tall guy with glasses, a goatee and a nearly bald head—was excited to hand over a book titled, No Cameras Allowed: My Career as an Outlaw Rock and Roll Photographer, 1981-1987. Through words and photographs author Julian Stone and friend of Lough, talks about his rebel act of sneaking camera equipment into concerts. Preceding Stone were photographers like Ross Haflin, who’s been the official tour photographer for big-name acts like Paul McCartney and The Who. Haflin fell into music photography “almost by accident” by pirating camera equipment, according to his website.

“The artist is putting on a performance, and there’s only two ways to capture that: a film or a photograph—and that facilitates them getting their message out,” Stone said. “How else is an image memorialized?”

Photography has the capacity to encapsulate an issue. “Photographs furnish evidence,” wrote Aaron Meskin and Jonathan Cohen, philosophy professors at UGA and the University of California, San Diego, respectively. In their journal article, Meskin and Cohen discussed the implications of photography—an “inherently realistic medium—and offer anecdotal examples: photography as legal evidence and historical evidence, such as war photography.

Terrebonne describes World War II and Vietnam War photography as some of the greatest photography, yet the worst photography. He shook his head and said, “I can’t imagine having to go out there and do that kind of stuff, but what they brought back…” Like Terrebonne, Smith alluded to war photography and expressed the tumultuous history of people hearing about what was happening, but not believing it; the visceral war photographs changed their minds. After getting a bachelor’s degree in communication, Smith went back to school and earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in photography,, studying its history. “I think photography played a big role making that impact that probably changed the tide of certain wars, or at least changed the perception of public support,” she said.

Music photography behaves in this same way. Documenting musicians and performance illustrates transformation from decade to decade, from think tank to think tank. Music provides a lens into what society is thinking, feeling, wanting, needing. Stone explained the photographer’s role as exemplified in images that showed the transition of the Beatles as a boy-band in the early 1960s to a band caught up in the social protest later that decade. Visually recording this transition has a cultural impact, he said. Photographers can popularize artists influencing social reformation, whose music might influence new thought.

Lough called music photography an active participation. “What good is a visual protest if there isn’t somebody there to make photos of it and spread that?” Lough asked. The photographer becomes a part of the collective, the community, built through music by being its essential promoter. The music may not be overtly political for this to be impactful. Photography elevates the celebrity, who has social capital, Lough explained. All artists have a message, a truth. They may separate political consciousness from the music, yet explicitly voice those concerns in interviews or on their website — like members from the alternative rock group Pinegrove, who plead with fans to vote for Bernie Sanders and include a photoshopped image of themselves and Sanders standing in front of the White House.

Photography and Community

Photographing musicians is memorializing music, “a free frequency” as Terrebonne put it, and can default to the musician’s political, social and cultural ideologies. Documenting this has the potential for connection. In her thesis, Tamara West, who holds a Ph.D. in Cultural Geography, wrote that photography is “embodied,” hinging on the act of “revisiting and reframing memory through the interactive spaces opened up by the image.” In other words, reflecting on a photograph imparts meaning and is inscribed differently through audience conversation.

Music photography can also be a religious discourse. For Smith’s husband Matt Smith, Theocracy is a ministry. “It’s about salvation and eternal life and things like that. It’s bigger than himself.” Back in the ‘80s and ‘90s, bands relied more on “getting the word out,” whereas people can find bands through their friends’ social media feeds. “Photography may have a more important role now than before,” she said.

Amber Perry Photographer Nolan Terrebonne poses with BMX bikers at the Skate Park of Athens during the park’s 15th birthday celebration in Athens, Georgia, on February 29, 2020.

To Terrebonne, getting involved in your local community is activism. “Activism means a lot of different things to a lot of different people. You could be an activist just by knowing who your neighbor is,” said Terrebonne. 

As a staff photographer for the Athens-Banner Herald, Athens’ local paper, Joshua Jones also has a passion for community building. Jones found his career through a long-standing interest in the arts, and by way of the Boy Scouts, an interest in civics. “This was a way to combine them both, to do something to make the world a better place,” he said. Jones has been with the Herald for three years now. Before that, he worked on the Flagpole Magazine staff, primarily covering music. He said that he appreciates the more all-encompassing aspect of working with the Herald, but music still finds its way into new projects. More recently, he’s been covering local musicians who are online streaming as a way to bring positivity to everyone under coronavirus-induced stress.

Small acts like photography can certainly invigorate the larger movements. Photographers create a record to reflect on — to know that tragedy happened, or protests, or even the punk show at the Athens Caledonia Lounge. The subject, albeit a battleground or a musician, speaks to something bigger, promotes something bigger. Photographs, digital or tangible, are history in the making. They are transmitted messages passed around members of a community. They are transformations waiting to happen — momentum for change lies within the interpretations and conversations of both the photographers and the viewers.

Read More

How Photography Has Become a Career – The Blue Banner

Lauren Callaghan

Photography Team

lcallagh@unca.edu

Tim Barnwell prepares his camera as he takes
a photograph in his studio of some objects for a project.

Photography became popular a long time ago and as a professional career, it is fairly popular
knowledge that photographers don’t make much money but some types are more successful
than others.

In speaking with three different photographers I learned how much the type of photographs
someone takes can change their career and their daily life.

I became interested in photography years ago. My mother took so many pictures of me growing
up and I naturally developed a fascination with cameras myself. My first real camera, a Polaroid,
allowed me to explore that world. Eventually I moved to phone cameras but those did not satisfy
my needs so last year I purchased my first digital camera. The digital age of cameras gave me
motivation to refine my skills and made me realize I might make photography a side or full-time
business one day.

Walking into Tim Barnwell’s photography studio immediately felt overwhelming but charming,
with photo related objects scattered about everywhere. Examples of his work lined a gray wall
just beyond the door with professional portraits and framed magazine spreads hung up. His
studio also contains a shelf opposite the wall with different books he made during the years
containing his photography. There were also hardware tools in the studio which puzzled me.
Filled with photo equipment at one end and his computer at another, it all seemed like too much.
The 64-year-old works as a professional photographer in Asheville.

Barnwell appeared to be well put together and clean shaven and came off as a kind person that had confidence but wasn’t overconfident. He became interested in photography starting in college at UNC Asheville.

“They didn’t offer photography when I was there so I started doing things on my own, I worked
for the media center there doing all the photography needs for the faculty, if they needed
enlargements done or slides processed or things like that, we would do that work,” Barnwell
said, sitting comfortably against the back of his chair.

He said his inspiration came from noticing the power of photographs and thinking about
traveling the world and visiting the places he would see in pictures.

“Later on I went to courses in Maine in 1978 on the Sun System, the view camera. That was
inspired by Ansel Adams and Edward Weston and a whole group of photographers that were
known as the F-64 group, and they were contemporaries, but had kind of come into their prime
in the ‘70s and ‘80s. They were inspiring because of the quality of their work and I’d seen
exhibits at Western Carolina. They used to have a real active photography program, they would
have photography exhibits come in,” the Bryson City native.

Barnwell typically focuses on commercial photography and fine art photography. He mainly
does pictures for advertising. He also takes business portraits. Barnwell seems to be pretty
succesful because he made his fine art photography into prints and eventually into seven books
that have been released so far, he said.

“Mostly what I do is art and craft work for people that live here. I do a lot of work for the hospital
system and commercial clients. I worked for many years as a freelancer for the Biltmore Estate
and for Chimney Rock State Park,” Barnwell said.

Asheville’s small size limits the specialties photographers are able to have because there isn’t
enough of all the specialties to go around, and plus Asheville is fairly competitive, the
commercial photographer said. Barnwell gave New York as an example. A photographer there
would be very specific, like in fashion.

Barnwell also focuses on some freelance photography and his newest book, an example of that,
documented the shrimping and fishing industry on the Carolina and Georgia coast in pictures.
He also released books on travel and the Blue Ridge Parkway.

“Most of my work like that is what I enjoy doing and what I try to do more of. It doesn’t pay as
well, so it’s something that I finance through my commercial work, but a lot of the projects have
been very successful and paid for themselves,” the photographer said.

Photographers sometimes struggle to maintain a financially stable career and have something
sustainable. Barnwell said when he first started his career that he would have said it was.

“It really changed with the advent of digital because digital kind of democratized photography so
that you didn’t have to learn how to do darkroom work and all this stuff that was kind of the
harder end of the spectrum,” Barnwell said.

Then there is Jennifer and Joe Mackey, who work as wedding photographers in the Asheville
area.

They left their typical nine to five jobs to pursue Jennifer’s passion in photography, whose
cousin had asked to photograph her wedding several years prior. Jennifer originally majored in
art and worked as a high school art teacher for a short time.

“While I was majoring in art, they make you take other courses, so they made me do
photography, and I did film photography and ended up loving it,” Mackey said.
The Mackeys’ photography business became so successful they opened a second studio and
they currently photograph 70-80 weddings a year.

“Mainly what we do is weddings and engagements but we also do proposals, family photo
sessions, maternity photos and corporate-type photoshoots. One thing we do not do is babies.
We’ve just learned babies aren’t our thing, they’re a little hard to deal with,” they said.

The Mackeys appeared in the tv show “Married at First Sight” earlier in 2019. They filmed a
wedding in Charlotte and said it was a cool opportunity to tell people their pictures were on
television. The couple also said it was neat to try a different way of shooting pictures.

Running a business appears to take up lots of time because they spend a lot of the time during
the week doing things other than photography. They have to do the accounting, paperwork and
contracts as well as edit pictures, so there are many things that go into what they do. The
Mackeys mainly enjoy shooting the pictures and meeting people because each couple is
different. They also like feeling the impact their pictures have on the couple because sometimes
they will receive calls from the parents with lots of praise.

“We probably work about 90 hours a week because we are hard workers and we want to be
successful so every day we’re working 12 plus hours a day, and it’s not always photos. It’s the
marketing, it’s the social media, it’s the editing that takes so much time, blogging, maintaining
our website,” the Mackeys said.

They schedule photoshoots about three or four days a week plus weddings, they said.

“We had a shoot today, we have a rehearsal dinner tomorrow, a wedding Saturday, and a shoot
Sunday, so every day we have something usually,” Jennifer Mackey said.

A third type of photographer does commercial work for a business. Adam Taylor, 52, from
Nashville, works as the photographer and videographer for the communication and marketing
department at UNC Asheville.

Taylor went to the School of Visual Arts in New York for an undergraduate degree and Georgia State University for a graduate degree. His inspiration came from switching out of band in high school to art class and falling in love with photography there.

“I had really no experience at that point in visual art and my teacher had made a darkroom out
of cardboard in the corner of the classroom. No one really used it but I was interested in it and
got a basic lesson from him,” Taylor said. “I tried it and just really liked it. I thought it was magic.”

His job is different from the typical photographer, because he doesn’t have the same
responsibilities as a professional photographer running their own studio does.

“A lot of photographers get into kind of a niche, video producers too. They get into something
and have a set of clients that are around that niche, whereas in a job like this, it’s really varied,”
Taylor said. “You don’t have to worry about the accounting, bookkeeping, billing and all that sort
of thing, which is a significant part of being in business.”

Some advice he gave to aspiring photographers was to find the types of photography one loves
most.

“Talk to people that have been in the field for awhile and see what the business is like, and
maybe even try to assist those people and get more first hand experience,” Taylor said.

Speaking with these three photographers truly showed me there isn’t just one type of
photography and I learned that I have a passion for photography. I realized I may want to follow
that passion and possibly start a full time business. I plan to take these photographers’ advice
and look into what it takes to run a business through talking to people and getting more
hands-on experience.

Read More

How Photography Has Become a Career – The Blue Banner – The Blue Banner

Lauren Callaghan

Photography Team

lcallagh@unca.edu

Tim Barnwell prepares his camera as he takes
a photograph in his studio of some objects for a project.

Photography became popular a long time ago and as a professional career, it is fairly popular
knowledge that photographers don’t make much money but some types are more successful
than others.

In speaking with three different photographers I learned how much the type of photographs
someone takes can change their career and their daily life.

I became interested in photography years ago. My mother took so many pictures of me growing
up and I naturally developed a fascination with cameras myself. My first real camera, a Polaroid,
allowed me to explore that world. Eventually I moved to phone cameras but those did not satisfy
my needs so last year I purchased my first digital camera. The digital age of cameras gave me
motivation to refine my skills and made me realize I might make photography a side or full-time
business one day.

Walking into Tim Barnwell’s photography studio immediately felt overwhelming but charming,
with photo related objects scattered about everywhere. Examples of his work lined a gray wall
just beyond the door with professional portraits and framed magazine spreads hung up. His
studio also contains a shelf opposite the wall with different books he made during the years
containing his photography. There were also hardware tools in the studio which puzzled me.
Filled with photo equipment at one end and his computer at another, it all seemed like too much.
The 64-year-old works as a professional photographer in Asheville.

Barnwell appeared to be well put together and clean shaven and came off as a kind person that had confidence but wasn’t overconfident. He became interested in photography starting in college at UNC Asheville.

“They didn’t offer photography when I was there so I started doing things on my own, I worked
for the media center there doing all the photography needs for the faculty, if they needed
enlargements done or slides processed or things like that, we would do that work,” Barnwell
said, sitting comfortably against the back of his chair.

He said his inspiration came from noticing the power of photographs and thinking about
traveling the world and visiting the places he would see in pictures.

“Later on I went to courses in Maine in 1978 on the Sun System, the view camera. That was
inspired by Ansel Adams and Edward Weston and a whole group of photographers that were
known as the F-64 group, and they were contemporaries, but had kind of come into their prime
in the ‘70s and ‘80s. They were inspiring because of the quality of their work and I’d seen
exhibits at Western Carolina. They used to have a real active photography program, they would
have photography exhibits come in,” the Bryson City native.

Barnwell typically focuses on commercial photography and fine art photography. He mainly
does pictures for advertising. He also takes business portraits. Barnwell seems to be pretty
succesful because he made his fine art photography into prints and eventually into seven books
that have been released so far, he said.

“Mostly what I do is art and craft work for people that live here. I do a lot of work for the hospital
system and commercial clients. I worked for many years as a freelancer for the Biltmore Estate
and for Chimney Rock State Park,” Barnwell said.

Asheville’s small size limits the specialties photographers are able to have because there isn’t
enough of all the specialties to go around, and plus Asheville is fairly competitive, the
commercial photographer said. Barnwell gave New York as an example. A photographer there
would be very specific, like in fashion.

Barnwell also focuses on some freelance photography and his newest book, an example of that,
documented the shrimping and fishing industry on the Carolina and Georgia coast in pictures.
He also released books on travel and the Blue Ridge Parkway.

“Most of my work like that is what I enjoy doing and what I try to do more of. It doesn’t pay as
well, so it’s something that I finance through my commercial work, but a lot of the projects have
been very successful and paid for themselves,” the photographer said.

Photographers sometimes struggle to maintain a financially stable career and have something
sustainable. Barnwell said when he first started his career that he would have said it was.

“It really changed with the advent of digital because digital kind of democratized photography so
that you didn’t have to learn how to do darkroom work and all this stuff that was kind of the
harder end of the spectrum,” Barnwell said.

Then there is Jennifer and Joe Mackey, who work as wedding photographers in the Asheville
area.

They left their typical nine to five jobs to pursue Jennifer’s passion in photography, whose
cousin had asked to photograph her wedding several years prior. Jennifer originally majored in
art and worked as a high school art teacher for a short time.

“While I was majoring in art, they make you take other courses, so they made me do
photography, and I did film photography and ended up loving it,” Mackey said.
The Mackeys’ photography business became so successful they opened a second studio and
they currently photograph 70-80 weddings a year.

“Mainly what we do is weddings and engagements but we also do proposals, family photo
sessions, maternity photos and corporate-type photoshoots. One thing we do not do is babies.
We’ve just learned babies aren’t our thing, they’re a little hard to deal with,” they said.

The Mackeys appeared in the tv show “Married at First Sight” earlier in 2019. They filmed a
wedding in Charlotte and said it was a cool opportunity to tell people their pictures were on
television. The couple also said it was neat to try a different way of shooting pictures.

Running a business appears to take up lots of time because they spend a lot of the time during
the week doing things other than photography. They have to do the accounting, paperwork and
contracts as well as edit pictures, so there are many things that go into what they do. The
Mackeys mainly enjoy shooting the pictures and meeting people because each couple is
different. They also like feeling the impact their pictures have on the couple because sometimes
they will receive calls from the parents with lots of praise.

“We probably work about 90 hours a week because we are hard workers and we want to be
successful so every day we’re working 12 plus hours a day, and it’s not always photos. It’s the
marketing, it’s the social media, it’s the editing that takes so much time, blogging, maintaining
our website,” the Mackeys said.

They schedule photoshoots about three or four days a week plus weddings, they said.

“We had a shoot today, we have a rehearsal dinner tomorrow, a wedding Saturday, and a shoot
Sunday, so every day we have something usually,” Jennifer Mackey said.

A third type of photographer does commercial work for a business. Adam Taylor, 52, from
Nashville, works as the photographer and videographer for the communication and marketing
department at UNC Asheville.

Taylor went to the School of Visual Arts in New York for an undergraduate degree and Georgia State University for a graduate degree. His inspiration came from switching out of band in high school to art class and falling in love with photography there.

“I had really no experience at that point in visual art and my teacher had made a darkroom out
of cardboard in the corner of the classroom. No one really used it but I was interested in it and
got a basic lesson from him,” Taylor said. “I tried it and just really liked it. I thought it was magic.”

His job is different from the typical photographer, because he doesn’t have the same
responsibilities as a professional photographer running their own studio does.

“A lot of photographers get into kind of a niche, video producers too. They get into something
and have a set of clients that are around that niche, whereas in a job like this, it’s really varied,”
Taylor said. “You don’t have to worry about the accounting, bookkeeping, billing and all that sort
of thing, which is a significant part of being in business.”

Some advice he gave to aspiring photographers was to find the types of photography one loves
most.

“Talk to people that have been in the field for awhile and see what the business is like, and
maybe even try to assist those people and get more first hand experience,” Taylor said.

Speaking with these three photographers truly showed me there isn’t just one type of
photography and I learned that I have a passion for photography. I realized I may want to follow
that passion and possibly start a full time business. I plan to take these photographers’ advice
and look into what it takes to run a business through talking to people and getting more
hands-on experience.

Read More

Boom raises $7M Series A in bid to become the ‘Amazon for commercial photography’ – TechCrunch

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27 Breathtaking Pictures From The Sky: Winners Of Aerial Photography Awards – Forbes

There’s something about seeing the planet from above that takes your breath away. The winners of the first-ever Aerial Photography Awards have been announced and the results will lift your spirits. For the contest, photographers around the world were asked to submit their best photos using drones, helicopters, kites, balloons or airplanes. The winning photos were selected through a 10-day vote by the members of the jury, with the winner receiving $10,000.

“For a first edition, the quality and diversity of the awarded photos demonstrates the evolution of aerial photography and the standards it has reached today,” says Christophe Martin, founder of the Aerial Photography Awards. “Aerial photographers prove their ability to amaze us. New visual writings are being built.”

The title “Aerial Photographer of the Year 2020” was awarded to photographer Sebastien Nagy, thanks to several awarded photos in different categories and a high average score. Residing in Brussels, the photographer began aerial photography on the rooftops of his city.

READ MORE: “The 20 Best Places To Travel In 2021: Where To Go Next”

Recommended For You

A number of other photos were also chosen for different categories ranging from travel to architecture to transportation. A building emerging from a sea of fog, a group of flamingos flying over Kenya and a fishing boat making an accidental portrait with its net are just some of the breathtaking shots. Here’s a look at the winning images.

Constructions category: A photo of the Dubai Frame, known as “the largest photo frame in the world,” photographed by the Lebanese photographer Bachir Moukarzel took first place.

Daily Life category: “The Lady of the Sea,” a photo taken by Vietnamese photographer Duy Sinh, shows a fishing net thrown from a boat, forming a woman’s face.

READ MORE: “A Village In Italy Wants To Pay You As Much As $52,500 To Move There”

Patterns category: A photo of multiple umbrellas crossing each other in the streets, taken by Japanese photographer Daniel Bonte, won first place.

Hotels category: A photo of clean white lodgings, shot in a hotel located in the Greek islands by Sebastien Nagy, won first place.

Wildlife category: A photo by Albert Dros of humpbacks swimming in Disko Bay won.

World in Lockdown category: Dedicated to photos that deal with the consequences of the Covid 19 pandemic, this picture by the Indian photographer Prabu Mohan depicts a building in Vietnam whose windows were all covered with the national flag as a sign of support.

Wildlife – The Most Beautiful Scenery category: Chinese photographer Hua Shang’s image of a group of flamingos flying over Lake Natron in Kenya was chosen by the jury.

Transportation category: The first place goes to a photo of a merchant ship navigating in the middle of the ice in the Gulf of Finland, shot by Russian photographer Alexander Sukharev.

Daily Life category: “Anchovy Catching,” a photo taken by photographer Thien Nguy, shows a boat with its green nets moving under the water in Vietnam’s Phu Yen province.

Travel category: The Chinese photographer Yiran Ding and his photo of Shanghai seen through an airplane window won.

Waterscapes category: This image by the UK based photographer Kyle Vollaers of a surrealist iceberg drifting off the coast of Qeqertarsuaq, Greenland was awarded.

Industrial category: Joel Jochum’s enigmatic image of an energy storage facility in Germany received the jury’s best votes.

Architecture category: It’s the photo of the Belgian photographer Sebastien Nagy, portraying an almost abstract cityscape, that takes the first place.

Daily Life category: A photo taken by photographer Khanh Phan shows the harvesting of grass from above.

Accommodations category: The jury chose a minimalist and colorful photo of the apartments of the Burj Khalifa taken by the German photographer Kevin Krautgartner.

Landscapes category: A landscape from another world, shot in the highlands of Iceland by the Swiss photographer Sebastian Müller, was best voted.

Cityscapes category: The colorful roofs of Gran Canaria Island shot by Sebastien Nagy won.

Trees & Forests category: A photograph of a herd of sheep crossing an autumn forest by Mehmet Aslan won first place.

Abstract category: A photograph of the Tatacoa desert in Colombia shot by the photographer Johan Vandenhecke was best voted.

Sports category: It is a refined photo of a tennis player “Ball up” by Australian photographer Brad Walls that seduced the jury.

World culture category: A photo of 600,000 devotees participating in the largest Eid-ul-Fitr congregation in Southeast Asia was taken by the Bangladeshi photographer Azim Khan Ronnie.

Wildlife – The Most Beautiful Scenery category: Chinese photographer Hua Shang’s image from a helicopter in Kenya was chosen by the jury.

Environmental category: A photo of farmers in the middle of a field devastated by floodwater, taken by the Bangladeshi photographer Azim Khan Ronnie received the best votes.

Digitally Enhanced category: It was the series of montages made from hundreds of aerial photos by the Brazilian photographer Cassio Vasconcellos that caught the attention of the jury.

Fine Art – Other category: The poetic photo of a child trying to grab a plastic bag by Canadian photographer Ryan Koopmans won first place.

Documentary category: Photographer Marc Le Cornu took first place with a photo of the Jersey Airport Rescue & Firefighting Service training on a burning plane.

Abandoned Places category: A photo of a WWI ship ruin on the French coast, photographed by the Belgian photographer Reginald Van de Velde received the best votes from the jury.

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Apple iPhone 12 vs Ricoh GR3: Street Photography Comparison – PetaPixel

Hello photography fans. Today I am going to pit the Ricoh GR III—the reigning champ of street photography—against the new iPhone 12. I want to see if the new iPhone will be able to replace, at least to a certain extent, your camera and if it still makes sense to buy a compact camera if the street photography is your main genre.

I think this comparison kind of makes sense when we take a look at the form factor of both “cameras” and the price points.

Now, just to be clear, the iPhone is probably going to beat the Ricoh as the better overall camera. It is definitely more versatile with its dual cameras and very good video specifications. However, when you buy Ricoh GR III you don’t buy it to film videos with it or for the zoom lens – which it doesn’t have. We Ricoh GR users use our legs to zoom in and out.

I dare say the majority of users are going to use this camera for one and one specific purpose only, which is street photography. It is a compact camera and it fits in your pocket so you can actually take it with you in almost any situations. That is where I see the iPhone as a close competitor.

Ricoh GR III was released earlier in 2019. It has a 24MP APS-C sensor with an 18mm f/2.8 lens, which comes out to a 28mm equivalent. It has a 3-axis in-body stabilization system, touchscreen LCD, and it can be charged via a USB Type-C port.

The iPhone 12 is equipped with 2 cameras, a Wide and an Ultra Wide, which translates into 13mm and 26mm equivalent for us photography types. It has a new sensor-based image stabilization system and Apple claims you can take up to 2 seconds handheld exposures. That’s a bold claim… something I am definitely going to test out. There is also a feature called Night Mode that helps you to take better pictures at night.

Meanwhile, Apple’s new “PRO Raw” and the LiDAR scanner is something Apple reserved for the “Pro” version which I will hopefully be able to test out later this month.

So let’s talk about controls. Right from the start we can see that Ricoh offers more photography settings because… well… all the settings are about photography. That’s great if you want the control, but can be a nuisance if you just want to shoot full auto and not worry about anything else.

What I love about Ricoh is that you can save 3 custom modes which you can adjust to your liking. My favorite function is the “highlight weighted” metering feature, which lets you expose just for the highlights—something you would need to download an external camera app to achieve on the iPhone. Another great feature of GR III is the ability to take a photo with a single tap on the LCD screen.

The iPhone, on the other hand, is the king of social media. But not only that. You will appreciate the option to simply share the photographs via iCloud and photo streams not only for your family events. With the iCloud plans you can basically take an infinite number of photographs without worrying about storage. With Ricoh. you have the option of 2GB of internal storage and, of course, a memory card slot. Which again can be a benefit or a pitfall depending on what you want.

The iPhone also has a beautiful OLED screen that’s twice as big as the LCD on the Ricoh, and it can also take HDR photographs. For casual shooter that can be a plus, but personally, I don’t think it’s something you really want or need if you do street photography. Finally, the iPhone is charged with the lightning connector which is annoying considering everything else uses USB Type C but you know… what can you do.

For this test I was using the default camera app and I have to say I was pleasantly surprised that it has been improved a lot. Where there used to be black bars on older iPhones we now have this transparent frame. Apple is probably using the ultra wide lens to show you the surroundings of your frame.

I have been saying for a while that LCD screen is the new viewfinder since you can easily see what is included or left out of your frame. With this new feature we are getting much closer to that. The ratio is still limited to 4 by 3 unlike in any “standard” camera, but I think in the end it is just a signature of that medium. When you see a square image you usually think of medium format. When you see 4 by 3 you know it was taken with a smartphone.

Now let’s talk about the image quality. I was surprised that the iPhone with a much smaller sensor is able to produce photographs with so much detail. When you check the file size the Raw photos from the GR are approximately 10x bigger, so they store far more data to work with. The iPhone, on the other hand, uses a powerful new CPU to drive Smart HDR and other computational photography features, helping to close the gap. This can be a plus for casual users and iPhone is going to be a killer for those family vacations.

Ricoh on the other hand offers much more creative options. The resolution is approximately twice as big as on the iPhone. You would however have to print actually quite large prints to see the difference.

Even though the iPhone is equipped with an f/1.6 aperture, it hardly produces any bokeh naturally. I would say it doesn’t matter that much for street photography since, you know, unless you’re Thorsten Overgaard you don’t really shoot wide-open all the time. I usually end up shooting between f/5 and f/8 with my full-frame cameras. That being said, the iPhone has artificial bokeh in the Portrait mode, creating a depth map of the image and then artificially applying blur to make the background layers progressively more out of focus.

Interesting thing is it offers you f/1.4 “simulation” even though the lens is actually an f/1.6. This, of course, looks ridiculous but if you play with it you can find a sweet spot where it actually looks fine. I think this one works best at f/5.6. Apple also added a LiDAR scanner to improve both low-light focusing and Portrait Mode this year, but they saved it for the iPhone 12 Pro.

The night photography is fine. It uses something called Night Mode which combines multiple exposures via computational photography to produce a cleaner final image. This mode uses a little too much sharpening and contrast for my taste, but it’s far better than a single high ISO exposure from such a tiny sensor. I think if Apple can get to some kind of compromise when it applies its filters but still keeps the Raw file untouched to work with that would be great.

I played with iPhone 12 for one and half days so these really are just my first impressions.

Anyways, for actually photography process. the Ricoh beats the iPhone with the grip. Holding the phone is never as good as a tactile camera with “feedback” unless you’re going to buy some kind of grip for the iPhone, which hardly anybody will do. Also holding a phone while taking photos makes you look like… well… someone taking photos with the phone.

To sum it up I just want to share with you the pros and cons of each device.

The Ricoh GR III is a highly specialized tool that will not tick a lot of boxes. You can think about it like a particular type of knife in the kitchen that you will use from time time—it’s only useful for one or two specific tasks, but for those things it delivers in spades. It offers more settings, better image quality, and its higher resolution for those who want to print larger images; however, the image quality isn’t as different as I expected.

Overall, I would say The Ricoh is better for creative photography.

The iPhone 12 on the other hand is this Swiss army knife that can do a lot of things and do them all reasonably well. The computational photography is perfect for the times you don’t want to bother with photo-editing, but it also limits your creativity a bit. Maybe the Apple PRO raw and LiDAR will change that with iPhone 12 Pro.

I would say if you are complete beginner the iPhone, and especially iPhone 12 Pro, offer a great value. You get 2 (or 3) different lenses, everything is automated for you, the depth of field means you won’t ever have anything out of focus, it takes great video, and it’s a perfect camera to have around for family events. The image quality is worse than Ricoh GR but if you are only sharing on social media it is hardly noticeable.

I think it is exciting how much smartphone photography has improved over the past few years, and I find myself wondering what we are going to see next. When I was watching the Apple Event a couple of weeks ago, I was just wondering what would be possible if Apple produced a full-frame camera with such computational power…

Well anyway, check out the video for more images and video footage examples and let me know what you think about this comparison. Do you like the new iPhone lineup for street photography? And if you don’t, what is it that the phones are still missing?


About the author: Martin Kaninsky is a photographer, reviewer, and YouTuber based in Prague, Czech Republic. The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author. Kaninsky runs the channel All About Street Photography. You can find more of his work on his website, Instagram, and YouTube channel.

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Photography Club announces annual awards – Pagosa Springs Sun

Photo courtesy Andy Butler
“Medusa on the Ridge” by Andy Butler took first place in the Creative category of the Pagosa Springs Photography Club’s annual Digital Photography Awards.

By Gregg Heid
Pagosa Springs Photography Club

The Pagosa Springs Photography Club held its annual Digital Photography Awards presentation on Oct. 14, by video conference. Winners of the third annual Pagosa Springs Digital Photography Competition were announced during the presentation. 

The contest received entries from 21 Photography Club members in four categories: Landscape, People, Creative and Nature. In total, 112 photos were entered. The images in each category were judged by two professional photographers on the basis of composition, impact and technical quality. In addition, this year the images were also voted on by club members to determine “People’s Choice” images. 

In the Nature category, winners were Chris Roebuck for his photo “Cougar.” Dave Anderson received second place for “Migration,” and Andy Butler’s photo “Sphinx Moth” was third. People’s Choice awards for the Nature category were Anderson, first for “Migration”; Darryl Saffer, second for “Colorado Columbine”; and third to Linda Pampinella for “the Stalker.”

The winning image in the People category was Fred Guthrie’s “Working Cowboy.” Guthrie also received second place for “Native Portrait.” Third place was awarded to Lorie Butts for “Gym Brat.” Guthrie’s two images tied for first in the People’s Choice voting, as well. The third place People’s Choice image was Dean Dussell’s “Masai #1.”

Among the images in the Creative category, the judges’ selections were “Medusa on the Ridge” by Butler, in first place; “Stonehead” by Guthrie, second place; and “Spring” by Dussell in third. This category’s People’s Choice awards went to Bill Milner, first for “Crater Lake”; Guthrie, second place for “Stonehead”; and Anderson, third place for “Cold Dinner.” 

In the Landscape category, the No. 1 image was Doug Coombs’ “Horseshoe Bend.” Second place went to Guthrie for “Escape from Alcatraz” and third place was “Tombstone Sunset” by Lorie Butts. The top People’s Choice vote also went to “Horseshoe Bend,” with Anderson in second place for “Photographing the Milky Way.” The People’s Choice voting resulted in a three-way tie for third place, between Dave Minkel for “Fire River,” Dussell for “Thermal Pools” and Butler for “Sunset at Morel Hoodoos.” 

All of the winning photographs may be viewed on the Photography Club’s website at https://pagosaspringsphotoclub.org/news/.

The Photography Club promotes educational, social and fun interactions between any and all who enjoy making and viewing great photography. The club sponsors educational programs and outings to help photographers hone their skills. Nonmembers are invited to attend a meeting to learn more about the club.

This story was posted on October 26, 2020.

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Can Fashion Photography Survive the Pandemic? – The New York Times

In the 1930s and ‘40s, when the photographer Louise Dahl-Wolfe took models out of the studio and onto location — shooting them poolside for Harper’s Bazaar, say — she was making pictures about freedom, about women’s changing role in society, about travel and leisure culture.

In 1975, when Helmut Newton took his famous image of the model Vibeke Knudsen in Yves Saint Laurent’s Le Smoking tuxedo, flanked by a nude female companion, he was capturing new ideas of sexuality and gender, lust and power.

And today, when Collier Schorr focuses her lens on androgynous models for fashion houses and magazines, she is conveying a softer, contemporary way of thinking about self-expression, fantasy and desire.

A fashion image is never just about clothes. For the last century, fashion photographers have celebrated the work of great designers while making nods, sometimes subtle, sometimes goading and explicit, to wider societal moods and shifts in politics and identity.

ImageA beach scene by Louise Dahl-Wolfe taken for Vogue magazine in 1959. It’s not just about the bathing suit.
Credit…Louise Dahl-Wolfe/Conde Nast, via Getty Images

Though few can afford the clothes, millions consume the pictures. Indeed, numerous photographers — Irving Penn, Henri Cartier-Bresson and Diane Arbus among them — did some of their greatest work on assignment for magazines.

But now the fashion world is in crisis: It is producing too much, moving too fast, and, with worrying frequency, offending consumers due to an inability to pivot convincingly from a position that champions a censoriously narrow vision of beauty. Brands are closing, and magazines are folding or becoming fully digital.

Can the fashion photograph, of the sort that has littered bedroom walls and been reposted again and again on Instagram or Tumblr, survive?

Probably not as we know it. That’s not necessarily a bad thing.

Even before the pandemic, conditions had grown tricky for the production of great fashion imagery. Budgets were being slashed. A shoot that in the past would have lasted two weeks was allocated two days, and photographers routinely tasked not just with producing an advertising campaign or editorial spread, but with creating social media and behind-the-scenes content as well.

The nail in the coffin for a certain moment of image-making seemed to come in 2018, when some of the handful of names who scooped up all the big campaigns, including Mario Testino and Bruce Weber, were accused of sexual harassment and assault.

Now COVID-19 has led to an “acceleration of what was going on before the pandemic,” said Sølve Sundsbø, the Norwegian photographer whose work has appeared in Love magazine and international editions of Vogue. Namely that even established magazines expect photographers to contribute editorial work for free.

Credit…Sølve Sundsbø/Art + Commerce

Subtler mood shifts are shaping images as well. “You look at Black Lives Matter, you look at the pandemic, you look at the incredible difference between rich and poor, and then you look at fashion,” Mr. Sundsbø said. “You do have moments where you think: I don’t want to be a part of this system.”

He believes such guilt has led to vaguely apologetic imagery, including the vogue over the last decade for deliberately unfussy, documentary-style fashion photography: images shot in daylight, with models posed as if just plucked from the street. “You try to normalize a five grand dress and $350,000 necklaces by putting them in a context that seems a little bit more normal,” Mr. Sundsbø said.

Indeed, already much of the fashion content that has come out of the pandemic has seemed to oscillate between shame and denial.

Tim Walker, famous for fantastical, often surreal images — a girl in a ball gown in a field, surrounded by paper birds; a model on the edge of a landing U.F.O. — said that he currently felt “uncomfortable making fashion pictures, in the traditional sense.”

He recalled that in the past, when working with magazines, “I was more looking at the shape of the dress and what it could give my fantasy. I didn’t question how it was made; I didn’t question how expensive it was. And I just find now I feel uncomfortable glorifying that type of thing.”

Credit…Tim Walker

His fashion work is on pause, he said, adding that even before the pandemic, budgets for shoots had shrunk by about eight times, as brands and publications tried to churn out more and more content. Everything was rushed.

“What you’re left with are magazines that are full, 90 percent, with commercial, relentless, accelerated photography,” said Mr. Walker. “It just doesn’t resonate or mean anything.”

Glen Luchford, who recently shot campaigns for Gucci and Rag & Bone, and whose 1990s campaigns for Prada are beloved by the art world, agreed. He recalled looking around the set at Gucci — the rare client with a big photography budget — and saying to his crew: “This is the last hurrah. This is the end. There is not going to be another period where we get to take over Universal Studios and build these massive sound stages and do these incredible things.

“I’m not even sure that quality is required anymore,” he continued. “Those kids out there, looking at TikTok, are way more interested in someone appearing in 10 or 20 seconds and doing something really interesting on their telephone than in something that is really beautifully lit.”

Credit…Glen Luchford/Gucci

As forums to view, create and consume imagery have proliferated, Mr. Luchford said, the days when drama, elegance and craft were the most important elements in a picture have disappeared. There’s something counterintuitive about representing perfectionism and elitism in a moment where inclusivity, honesty and vulnerability are prized, and the requirement of creative work is increasingly to be a carrier for modern, if vague, notions of authenticity, individuality and empowerment.

The photographer Shaniqwa Jarvis, who has worked with Supreme and Fear of God, has observed a similar shift. “Everyone is so focused on tone and messaging right now,” she said. “That’s a really big thing. If your art’s not political, what are you saying, what are you doing?”

That has caused some, like Mr. Luchford, to think afresh about what they can contribute. “Why keep churning out a picture of a girl in a dress?” he asked. “I’m not sure if my snooty white middle-class images work anymore. I’m not sure if I’m out of touch.”

Credit…Shaniqwa Jarvis
Credit…Shaniqwa Jarvis

By contrast, despite having been in the industry for over 20 years, Ms. Jarvis has suddenly been inundated with calls. “I think I’ve benefited from all the white guilt,” she said. “People just want to fill the project with a Black or brown face” — even if the work does not match the idea. Yet, she said, “As image-makers, we do have a responsibility to comment on these times.”

Even if that’s in a magazine. Because, despite all the issues, a cover is “still regarded as one of the most important platforms in which a fashion photograph can make a statement,” Antwaun Sargent wrote in the book The New Black Vanguard, which chronicles the rise of image-makers of color, including the buzzy Tyler Mitchell, whose break came at age 13 in 2018, when he photographed Beyoncé for Vogue.

In doing so, Mr. Mitchell became the first Black photographer ever to shoot the magazine’s cover, a job that broke with the rigid power structures of fashion tradition, yet simultaneously reinforced them by casting Vogue as kingmaker.

Credit…Quil Lemons

Quil Lemons, 23, is another rising star. He recently photographed Spike Lee, staring down the camera in the center of a New York street, for the cover of Variety. Like Miss Jarvis, Mr. Lemons expressed frustration with feeling he was just on “the list of Black people they now need to hire.”

And yet, he said, he felt that magazines were inescapable. Social media is helpful in demanding recognition, and calling out inequalities, but in popular consciousness, a magazines signals credibility and context that will take years to change.

“It’s an entry point for so many people,” he said.

Still, Mr. Lemons believes his generation is carving out a new kind of fashion image. In 2017, he made a series called Glitterboy, featuring unfussy portraits of young Black men against pink backdrops, their faces covered in glitter; the pictures were published by i-D.

Credit…Quil Lemons

For Vogue, Mr. Lemons has shot his family, including his young sisters, in apartments and gardens near where he grew up in South Philadelphia. The budgets he’s working with may be smaller than in the past, and the opportunities for outlandish demands clipped, but beauty will prevail, he said.

When Mr. Lemons looks at the cannon of fashion photography widely mourned as the last of a great era — images like Richard Avedon’s 1955 “Dovima with Elephants,” featuring a model in a Dior gown, arms outstretched to caress the trunks of two chained circus elephants (now one of the most expensive fashion images sold at auction) — Mr. Lemons does not see himself, or his viewpoint.

He doesn’t see it in shots of wide-eyed models abroad, the camera caressing the contrast between their whiteness and the exoticism of the surroundings. Nor in images of models posed with people of color like props, or plopped into incongruous, flamboyant locations. He sees it in something else.

“Why can’t the everyday Black person be your fantasy?” he said. “A fantasy is anything you dream of, and I don’t dream of white women running through the Sahara.”

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Do You Still Enjoy Photography at All? – Fstoppers

This year has been tough in every aspect, no question about it. Has your love for photography also suffered through this?

During the lockdown period throughout the summer, I often heard, or rather, read online, dismayed comments from fellow photographers who had not picked up a camera in months. Whether it was the hectic changes in family and professional life or simply a lack of motivation due to generally feeling down and discouraged, plenty of creatives went through similar feelings. Some are still processing this and going through it. So, how can we take steps to return to that feeling we maybe used to get while the world, our business, and our creative future weren’t as confusing?

The reason why many saw themselves not picking up their camera was undoubtedly the physical lack of paid photography jobs available. This might have also made you realize how little you actually used to use photography purely for creative or recreational purposes before all of this. It’s easy to fall into a routine of working hard to build a business and slowly move away from what perhaps gave you the ambition to enter that business in the first place. Some of us have a natural passion for building business, be it photography or otherwise, while the creative processes in the background aren’t as crucial. However, for many, the creative side is what motivates and excites us more so than the business itself.

Either way, with such large disruptions to our business life, it’s natural that our creative energy suffered. Understandably, the reason why you didn’t pick up that camera was that just a mere look at it made you feel drained and reminded you of all the losses suffered. It’s also unsurprising that you might feel the same way not just about the creative side of photography but about your business as a whole. Personally, I am still questioning my previous plans I set out for myself and am learning to accept that I will need to adjust to the new “normal,” which might mean moving away from what I initially thought my future was going to be.

Equally, some creatives have been forced to take on additional or new jobs, which might be a complete u-turn on what the photography career is all about. Gaining new responsibilities and a different schedule means that photography will take up a slightly different part of their lives, which may take a while to get used to. This acclimatization period may eat into large amounts of time and energy that otherwise would have been spent on creative tasks or projects.

But, it’s not all doom and gloom. Creativity is something we can rely on to bring us some well-needed escape. Small, intentional and manageable projects are bound to bring back those positive feelings. I found myself using my smartphone more regularly for brief photography projects as I go on about my day because I always have it on me so there is no excuse not to use it. If you are wishing to get back into the process of creation, consider joining or setting up a small group of like-minded people where you give each other a daily, weekly, or monthly task or project. It will keep you more accountable, which in return will help you get to that satisfactory feeling after you have finished a personal project.

Use equipment that is enjoyable and easily accessible. For example, for my personal work, I primarily use a small and fast Fuji camera, which can easily fit in my handbag. I always keep it charged so I can grab it whenever inspiration strikes me. If you have heaps of professional equipment that you simply don’t have the energy to use for your personal projects, consider using your smartphone, or if you have any spare funds, invest in a small, affordable camera that you can take with you anytime and anywhere.

It’s a lot easier to force ourselves to finish a paid job or to answer client’s messages because we know this is our livelihood. When it comes to creativity, it’s definitely not easy. But, step by step, you can start introducing it back into your daily life and routine to bring back that passion and excitement, even if it means simply documenting your family life at home. Remind yourself of how you used to feel during an enjoyable shoot or a photography walk or trip. Look through your photo archives and find unedited gems. And keep that camera charged up so you can reach for it and snap whatever caught your eye that day. Sometimes, a simple, imperfect image can be enough to give us the positivity to last through the day.

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